Illustration of woman in a swirly design with a key next to her
The fast-acting drug offers a new way to treat depression and fathom its origins. Recent approval of a nasal spray promises to expand access, but much remains unknown.
  • Knowable Magazine
Your selections: Therapies
The cochlear implant is a near-miraculous device, widely considered the most effective brain-machine interface technology yet developed. Now, researchers are working to make this very good implant even better.
  • The Dana Foundation
Fight a zombie apocalypse while learning about neuroscience.
  • PBS
With this informative website, learn more about epilepsy and seizures.
  • Kids Health
Three neuroscientists discuss how addiction is a disease of the brain, as well as prospects for improved pharmacological treatments.
  • The Kavli Foundation
Guys who need it have Viagra; Ladies with the similar needs have nothing now that the FDA has denied approval of a new drug, flibanserin, which would treat sexual dysfunction in women.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Learn how bionics are changing people's lives today: helping the blind see, the deaf hear, and a woman with one arm fold her shirts.
  • National Geographic
The Children's Hospital of Wisconsin outlines the causes, symptoms, and treatment for different types of brain tumors.
  • Children's Hospital of Wisconsin
See for yourself what happens to the brain during a head injury. This short video is a great resource to enhance your lesson plans.
  • PBS
Apostolos P. Georgopoulos, M.D., Ph.D., discusses the large effort expended in developing and testing BMIs and the ultimate goal of long-term safe and useful application of BMI technology to humans.
  • The Dana Foundation
Researchers throughout the world are pursuing a variety of new ways to repair or replace neurons and other cells in the brain. For the most part, these experimental approaches are still being worked out in animals and cannot be considered therapies for humans at this time.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Whether cancerous or not, brain tumors are serious because they can interfere with normal brain function.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
As our understanding of the processes that underlie brain damage progresses, it becomes possible to use small-molecule drugs, such as antibiotics and anti-tumor drugs, to alter these processes.
  • BrainFacts/SfN