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Ceiling height and window light don’t just concern interior designers. Neuroscientists are examining how room design evokes specific cognitive responses.
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Three experts discuss photosensitive epilepsy and how flashing lights can trigger seizures.
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Your body is even more vigilant about regulating and tracking its internal temperature than the best weather channel.
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Donning a pair of 3-D glasses at the movies can us immerse in the action. But the technology that makes 3-D movies work has always existed inside our brains.
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Goosebumps are part of your body’s reaction to danger. But they can also be caused by great music. Those two experiences are more similar than you might think.
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Smelling salts, an old remedy for fainting, are now used by some athletes to trigger alertness. Neurologist Erin Manning explains how they work.
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CRISPR makes altering DNA easier than ever before. Is it the future of genetics?
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Neuroscientist Denise Bellinger explains vagus nerve stimulation, its history as a medical treatment, and whether commercial VNS devices are effective and safe.
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The brain has some intense energy needs thanks to the unique role it plays in the body.
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Diets high in fat and low in carbohydrates can reduce the frequency of epileptic seizures.
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Not all seizures are as dramatic as the ones you see on TV.
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Michael Rogawski discusses the similarities between migraine attacks and epileptic seizures and what they might mean for treating the two conditions.
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