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Silvia Arber, Martyn Goulding, and Ole Kiehn have identified the cells and circuits in the spinal cord and brainstem that make all kinds of movement possible.
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When you exercise, your muscles and liver release proteins into your blood that exert powerful influence on your brain.
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Diminished levels of the protein cause a common side effect of Parkinson's treatment.
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Find out ways to improve your brain health and achieve your 2022 New Year’s resolutions.
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Perspective taking can help us understand what it’s like to live with Huntington’s disease.
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The spontaneous behavior helps both the speaker and the listener.
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The golden poison frog packs enough poison in its skin to kill upwards of 20 people, yet it avoids succumbing to the toxin itself.
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And other neuroscience news in May 2021.
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Vagus nerve stimulation, in conjunction with physical therapy, could help stroke patients recover more movement.
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More than 10 million people worldwide are living with Parkinson’s disease.
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A mutation in the RORB gene leads to low levels of a spinal cord protein and impedes hopping.
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While it may feel like you’ve suffered an injury, this is a natural part of the body’s recovery from working out.
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