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Video chats tax our attention systems without delivering the same social rewards as in-person interactions — leaving us exhausted and dissatisfied.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Brain breaks help children by replenishing attention, improving learning, and boosting creativity. But, it turns out we might all benefit from giving our brains more downtime. Here’s why.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Brain imaging and computer modeling evidence pinpoints the area of the brain that perceives environmental boundaries — and stops you from running into them.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Smelling salts, an old remedy for fainting, are now used by some athletes to trigger alertness. Neurologist Erin Manning explains how they work.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
We all do it, but are we really as good at multitasking as we think? Can students learn something new without actively paying attention to it?
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Michael Buice from the Allen Institute for Brain Science in Seattle, explains how our brains construct the visual world that surrounds us.
  • Allen Institute
Your eyes can play tricks on you, and visual illusions take advantage of these glitches in our perception.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
Research could lead to new rehabilitative therapies when the visual cortex is damaged.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
This site provides information on Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and the many ways that it can affect cognition.
  • BrainLine
When two tasks demand competing attention, there is generally a switching that occurs between the neural processes involved, rather than concurrent processing as may be expected with true multitasking.
  • BrainFacts/SfN
In this lesson by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, students learn the likely causes of distracted driving and its possible effects.
  • American Association for the Advancement of Science